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AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

This is a discussion on AMA's Position on Loud Pipes within the Motorcycle Discussion forums, part of the General category; Excessive Motorcycle Noise (found it on another forum) The American Motorcyclist Association, established in 1924, has maintained a position of ...


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Old 01-09-2007   #1
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

Excessive Motorcycle Noise (found it on another forum)

The American Motorcyclist Association, established in 1924, has maintained a position of strong opposition to excessive motorcycle noise throughout its history. It has funded information and public relations campaigns in support of quiet motorcycle use and was the first motorsports sanctioning body in the world to regulate and reduce the sound level of racing vehicles.

The Association believes that few other factors contribute more to misunderstanding and prejudice against the motorcycling community than excessively noisy motorcycles. A minority, riding loud motorcycles, may leave the impression that all motorcycles are loud. In fact, a significant percentage of the public does not realize that motorcycles are built to federally mandated noise control standards.

Each segment of the motorcycling community -- including the riders, event organizers, retailers and distributors, original equipment and aftermarket manufacturers, law enforcement and the safety community -- must realize that it cannot single- handedly solve this problem. However, each has a role and a responsibility in achieving a solution.

Shifting blame and failing to adopt responsible policies on a voluntary basis can only result in greater prejudice and discrimination against motorcycling. The consequences of continuing to ignore this issue will likely result in excessively rigorous state and federal standards, more expensive and less attractive motorcycles, the reduction of choices in aftermarket products, abusive enforcement of current laws and other solutions undesirable to riders and the motorcycle industry.

Based on its opposition to excessive motorcycle noise, the American Motorcyclist Association recommends the following:

All motorcyclists should be sensitive to community standards and respect the rights of fellow citizens to enjoy a peaceful environment.
Motorcyclists should not modify exhaust systems in a way that will increase sound to an offensive level.
Organizers of motorcycle events should take steps through advertising, peer pressure and enforcement to make excessively loud motorcycles unwelcome.
Motorcycle retailers should discourage the installation and use of excessively loud replacement exhaust systems.
The motorcycle industry, including aftermarket suppliers of replacement exhaust systems, should adopt responsible product design and marketing policies aimed at limiting the cumulative impact of excessive motorcycle noise.
Manufacturers producing motorcycles to appropriate federal standards should continue to educate their dealers and customers that louder exhaust systems do not necessarily improve the performance of a motorcycle.
Law enforcement agencies should fairly and consistently enforce appropriate laws and ordinances against excessive vehicle noise.
The motorcycle industry and the safety community should educate customers that excessive noise may be fatiguing to riders, making them less able to enjoy riding and less able to exercise good riding skills.
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q: What is "excessive noise?"
A: No one likes excessive or unreasonable noise. Confusion arises because everyone has a different definition of "excessive." Noise considered excessive in one environment may be acceptable in another. It's up to you to determine what is excessive. This determination shouldn't always be based on the rider, but rather the conditions around the rider. Some factors to consider include surroundings, time of day, traffic mix, people present, etc.

Q: Why did the AMA suddenly issue this position statement?
A: The AMA has fought motorcycle bans in St. Louis, Detroit, Brockton, Massachusetts, and Springfield, Illinois. The foundation for each was tied to excessive noise. More recently we have confronted proposed motorcycle prohibitions in Chicago and New York City. Motorcycle noise, again, was the justification for these proposals.

In the past several years, the AMA has spent well over $100,000 defending lawsuits and confronting legislative prohibitions initiated by zealous legislators responding to their belief that motorcycles are too loud. In Europe, where road closures to stifle excessive noise are becoming almost commonplace, anti-tampering legislation and restrictive sound emission requirements are under serious consideration.

The position results from the Board's desire to avoid further restrictions on motorcycling. If the excessive noise problem is not addressed voluntarily, and in a timely fashion, these restrictions are inevitable. The Board agrees that failing to raise this warning, despite the potential negative reception by some, would be shirking their responsibility to AMA members and the motorcycling community.

Q: If my exhaust is modified or capable of producing "excessive noise," will I be denied access to AMA or other motorcycle events?
A: There are no plans to do so. However, all motorcyclists need to become more sensitive to how they affect others. The AMA has encouraged event organizers to use advertising, peer pressure and enforcement of event rules to discourage excessively loud motorcycles.

Q: Why should appropriate laws and ordinances against excessive vehicle noise be fairly and consistently enforced?
A: The AMA believes that if existing laws and ordinances governing excessive noise from vehicles of all types were fairly and consistently enforced, the problem of noisy vehicles would be effectively eliminated.

Q: What good is it to regulate myself if others continue to make excessive noise?
A: Excessive noise is not the fault of any one brand, any particular style of bike, or any single segment of the motorcycle industry. It is a community-wide problem and we all need to be part of the solution.

Q: Is the AMA telling me to replace my aftermarket exhaust with an original-equipment exhaust?
A: No. However, modified exhaust systems should not increase sound to an offensive level.
NylonLegs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007   #2
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

Simply put we all need to respect others. But isn't it funny how unbaffled pipes are against the law in most states whereas million watt speakers in automobiles is not?

Personally I stand by the AMA. They are tireless individuals who steadily walk the thin line of personal responsibility and individual freedom in the struggle to maintain our lifestyle.
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Old 01-10-2007   #3
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

Excessive Motorcycle Noise (found it on another forum)

The American Motorcyclist Association, established in 1924, has maintained a position of strong opposition to excessive motorcycle noise throughout its history. It has funded information and public relations campaigns in support of quiet motorcycle use and was the first motorsports sanctioning body in the world to regulate and reduce the sound level of racing vehicles.

The Association believes that few other factors contribute more to misunderstanding and prejudice against the motorcycling community than excessively noisy motorcycles. A minority, riding loud motorcycles, may leave the impression that all motorcycles are loud. In fact, a significant percentage of the public does not realize that motorcycles are built to federally mandated noise control standards.

Each segment of the motorcycling community -- including the riders, event organizers, retailers and distributors, original equipment and aftermarket manufacturers, law enforcement and the safety community -- must realize that it cannot single- handedly solve this problem. However, each has a role and a responsibility in achieving a solution.

Shifting blame and failing to adopt responsible policies on a voluntary basis can only result in greater prejudice and discrimination against motorcycling. The consequences of continuing to ignore this issue will likely result in excessively rigorous state and federal standards, more expensive and less attractive motorcycles, the reduction of choices in aftermarket products, abusive enforcement of current laws and other solutions undesirable to riders and the motorcycle industry.

Based on its opposition to excessive motorcycle noise, the American Motorcyclist Association recommends the following:

All motorcyclists should be sensitive to community standards and respect the rights of fellow citizens to enjoy a peaceful environment.
Motorcyclists should not modify exhaust systems in a way that will increase sound to an offensive level.
Organizers of motorcycle events should take steps through advertising, peer pressure and enforcement to make excessively loud motorcycles unwelcome.
Motorcycle retailers should discourage the installation and use of excessively loud replacement exhaust systems.
The motorcycle industry, including aftermarket suppliers of replacement exhaust systems, should adopt responsible product design and marketing policies aimed at limiting the cumulative impact of excessive motorcycle noise.
Manufacturers producing motorcycles to appropriate federal standards should continue to educate their dealers and customers that louder exhaust systems do not necessarily improve the performance of a motorcycle.
Law enforcement agencies should fairly and consistently enforce appropriate laws and ordinances against excessive vehicle noise.
The motorcycle industry and the safety community should educate customers that excessive noise may be fatiguing to riders, making them less able to enjoy riding and less able to exercise good riding skills.
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q: What is "excessive noise?"
A: No one likes excessive or unreasonable noise. Confusion arises because everyone has a different definition of "excessive." Noise considered excessive in one environment may be acceptable in another. It's up to you to determine what is excessive. This determination shouldn't always be based on the rider, but rather the conditions around the rider. Some factors to consider include surroundings, time of day, traffic mix, people present, etc.

Q: Why did the AMA suddenly issue this position statement?
A: The AMA has fought motorcycle bans in St. Louis, Detroit, Brockton, Massachusetts, and Springfield, Illinois. The foundation for each was tied to excessive noise. More recently we have confronted proposed motorcycle prohibitions in Chicago and New York City. Motorcycle noise, again, was the justification for these proposals.

In the past several years, the AMA has spent well over $100,000 defending lawsuits and confronting legislative prohibitions initiated by zealous legislators responding to their belief that motorcycles are too loud. In Europe, where road closures to stifle excessive noise are becoming almost commonplace, anti-tampering legislation and restrictive sound emission requirements are under serious consideration.

The position results from the Board's desire to avoid further restrictions on motorcycling. If the excessive noise problem is not addressed voluntarily, and in a timely fashion, these restrictions are inevitable. The Board agrees that failing to raise this warning, despite the potential negative reception by some, would be shirking their responsibility to AMA members and the motorcycling community.

Q: If my exhaust is modified or capable of producing "excessive noise," will I be denied access to AMA or other motorcycle events?
A: There are no plans to do so. However, all motorcyclists need to become more sensitive to how they affect others. The AMA has encouraged event organizers to use advertising, peer pressure and enforcement of event rules to discourage excessively loud motorcycles.

Q: Why should appropriate laws and ordinances against excessive vehicle noise be fairly and consistently enforced?
A: The AMA believes that if existing laws and ordinances governing excessive noise from vehicles of all types were fairly and consistently enforced, the problem of noisy vehicles would be effectively eliminated.

Q: What good is it to regulate myself if others continue to make excessive noise?
A: Excessive noise is not the fault of any one brand, any particular style of bike, or any single segment of the motorcycle industry. It is a community-wide problem and we all need to be part of the solution.

Q: Is the AMA telling me to replace my aftermarket exhaust with an original-equipment exhaust?
A: No. However, modified exhaust systems should not increase sound to an offensive level.

WHAT?
rlproctor72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007   #4
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

:) :) :) :) :)
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Old 01-12-2007   #5
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

I agree with that as well, but if we're going to come down on motorcyclists then lets ban the punks with the subwoofers that vibrate my car when I'm beside them at a traffic light and the kids driving the little import cars with the exhaust systems that make them sound like Nextel Cup cars.
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Old 01-13-2007   #6
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

C50, most bikers think the law is coming down on bikers to discriminate against them, but you have to admit that there are more bikers with loud pipes than there are kids who have loud radios. And, the noise laws in most states are just that, noise laws. They have nothing to do with motorcycles. It just happens to be that our loud bikes are the most obvious offenders. I was rapping up the pipes on my friend's split 6-cylinder, and believe me, it was just as loud as any motorcycle. I got stopped and ticketed for doing so in Sioux Falls, SD. The AMA has spent lots of money defending against motorcycles being banned entirely from cities, and I believe that cities will get tougher and tougher as there are more motorcycles on the street.

And hey guys, those aren't my words. I merely copied it from a post on another forum, and the guy who copied it to that post is a pretty straight up guy, and I have no reason to doubt that it's directly from the AMA. If you question it, go into the AMA webpage and check it out.

Incidentally, I just received my Vance & Hines LongShots for my bike, so I might be just as guilty as the rest of the loud pipe bikers. But, if they're so loud that they're offensive, you can bet I'm going to tone them down a bit.

I equate loud bikes to the speedboats on our lake. Since this lake is 94 miles long, and last Labor Day, there were 250,000 boats on the lake then, it got pretty darned loud at times. There is a noise law on this lake, but nobody enforces it. Too bad, because it's very offensive to those of us who live here full time.

You guys can make statements all day long about loud radios, etc., but that doesn't make it right if you're offending someone with your loud pipes. Think about it! There is an old saying - my freedom ends where yours begins. But, some people forget that it works the other way, too. I wonder what the AMA could be doing with all that money they spend to defend our riding rights because of the noise. It could be spending the money on things that would better benefit all of us.
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Old 01-14-2007   #7
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

I think we have to distinguish between louder pipes, and ridiculously loud pipes. My wife and I took the kids to an outdoor restaurant last summer that was on Rt. 19, a major route for bikes. Most of the bikes coming by had aftermarket pipes, but weren't obnoxiously loud. Then someone came by that obviously had no baffles in his straight pipes, and it was just unconscionably loud. That's what needs to be enforced.

I live near I79, and can hear the vehicles going by. The pickups with their aftermarket exhausts are just as loud as the bikes and more plentiful. Being Pittsburgh, we have fewer imports with their fartcans, but they're in the mix also.

I think the AMA should enlist Al Gore, motorcycles at 45-60 mpg are much better environmentally than the car that sits in the garage while we're commuting.
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Old 01-14-2007   #8
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

Uesque, that's very true, who is to decide?? That's the real question. There are some people who will gripe if a snake crawled past, because it was too loud!

BUT, (I always add one,don't I?) the AMA is concerned with people's concepts of motorcycles, not other types of vehicles. We can't expect them to police the entire world. Also, I'm sure their lawyers are smart enough to point that out to people who want to ban us.
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Old 01-15-2007   #9
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

You guys can make statements all day long about loud radios, etc., but that doesn't make it right if you're offending someone with your loud pipes. Think about it! There is an old saying - my freedom ends where yours begins. But, some people forget that it works the other way, too. I wonder what the AMA could be doing with all that money they spend to defend our riding rights because of the noise. It could be spending the money on things that would better benefit all of us.

One question? Who are you arguing with here? We're all saying the same thing here. It's personal responsibility and respecting the rights of others. To me it's doing that without jeopardizing personal freedom.

O.K. Two questions. How much active involvement have you had personally with the AMA? It sounds like a personal attack on the AMA. And it also sounds as though you don't really know what they do for ALL motorcyclists. The idea is figuring out how to bring motorcyclist together and not drive a wedge through the community of riders; as close-minded riders have repeatedly done in the past by being critical of one another and/or their choice of motorcycles. The truth is, if it wasn't for the AMA you and the work they've done for nearly half century none of us would be riding motorcycles. Fact is, you don't know what they spend money on or where they get their money. And your freedom to ride is their gift to you; believe it or not.
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Old 01-15-2007   #10
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Default AMA's Position on Loud Pipes

I agree theres a difference between "thats sounds sweet" and "some one kill him hes giving me a migrane". My bike dosnt get loud until about 10k rpm when it starts screaming but even still its not too loud plus if i get to that point im probly not around some one long enough to annoy them :D

And I agree with shutting up those loud speakers too, I dont know if the people who have them realize that the sound gets distorted when it travels so far away and it just sounds like crap, not to mention if theres any loose bolts your going to loose them. But in Florida there is a law, if a cop can hear it from such a distance like 75 ft away (not sure if thats right) than you can get a ticket.

Another thing that is starting around here, and I see it more with the teenage country boys, is putting PA speakers in the grill of their truck and hooking it up to their stereo, that sounds like shit when its traveling down the road and theres no purpose for it other than annoying every one around you.
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