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First ride on the CBR 1000

This is a discussion on First ride on the CBR 1000 within the Sportbikes forums, part of the Types of Bikes category; Link ( http://www.amasuperbike.com/2003-Dec/031211b.htm.htm ) First Ride 2004 CBR1000RR detailed report will follow ... by dan coe Thursday, December 11, 2003 ...


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Old 02-05-2006   #1
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

Link (http://www.amasuperbike.com/2003-Dec/031211b.htm.htm)

First Ride 2004 CBR1000RR
detailed report will follow ...
by dan coe
Thursday, December 11, 2003

Danny D. Coe rode the CBR1000RR yesterday, and you read about it today.
image by honda
Honda introduced their 2004 full-liter Grand Marshal at the all new Arizona Motorsports Park in Surprise Arizona. Until now Honda has been more than relatively tight lipped regarding the new machine, and with the track unknown as well, Soup was anxious to climb aboard and experience Honda's latest E-ticket ride.

While on the west coast and suiting up in the chill of the morning, news of Ben Bostrom's riding the HRC version of the CBR at Daytona was already swirling around the Arizona paddock. This helped quell speculation and validate the impressive claims Honda personnel made during CBR's technical presentation last night.

What was introduced is a totally new machine from the ground up, which engineers have based around the design philosophy of the dominant RC211V. New and innovative features with great strides throughout have been made the CBR more compact with improved handling, drivability, engine output, rider safety and much more.

Posting a dry weight of 396 pounds and claiming 172 crank horsepower @ 10,500 in standard 49 state-trim, the power plant has been totally redesigned with a new bore and stroke (75mm / 56.5mm). This 998cc configuration allows for a narrow and compact design with more vertical cylinder positioning, stacked transmission with removable cassette, a relocated right side oil filter and starter drive. Engineers were able to shorten the power plant 40mm. This reduction permitted the engine to be placed closer to the front wheel and accomplish another key goal, the fitment of a 34 mm longer swingarm, yet with a minimal 15mm increase to the overall wheelbase. The theme here is "Mass Centralization" with Honda's critical focus accounting for exactly where all weight is placed. On familiar terms, perhaps close comparisons can be made with the successful CBR 600RR, with the 1000 carrying its fuel load lower, due in part to additional space provided by Honda's patented Pro Link rear suspension, again a concept grafted from the Moto GP machine.

Virtually everything is new and warrants detailing in a comprehensive report that will follow, but before we go much further, some quick track impressions of today's ride.

Sitting on the CRR has all new feel. The bars have been lowered and the tank cover shortened, allowing for the rider to sit further forward on the machine. In addition, the footpeg location has been moved both up and back, with all of these changes leaning towards more compact and front end accessible riding position and GP machine feel.

Upon starting the engine crisp throttle response blips are met with almost two-stroke- like response, while the exhaust note resonates instantly from the single up rear exhaust. At idle and stand still the note is mild, but once on the track the sound alone near its 12,500 peak is pure music. The CBR exhaust note later would serve as a perception tool in completing the loop between rider, machine feedback, engine rpm and pending wheel spin on the track. Arizona Motorsports Park proved to be a superb new location to test the CBR. The circuit offers a decent mix of technical corners, a flowing layout which places a premium on precise corner entry, almost all of which lead into fast and ultra wide exits and short shoots. Although the 1000 never shifted past fourth gear and saw only a terminal 154 mph peak, the majority of time was spent using second and third gears, applying the entire powerband. Here the prime tarmac allowed for strong drive off corners and an almost user friendly type of rear traction control. This is a direct result of the Unit Pro Link suspension and the fitment of the longest swingarm in the liter class at 585mm. This system increases rear traction feel by isolating rear suspension inputs within the swingarm and minimizing negative feedback into the frame forward of the pivot. In engineering terms, the shortening of the engine, adding length to the swingarm and moving the pivot forward has reduced the "Roll Polar Moment of Inertia." These are not just buzz words, it works. The swingarm now accounts for over 43% of the overall wheelbase.

All straight-aways eventually end and with the CBR it happens in a hurry. To stop the CBR, Honda opted for four-piston radially mounted Tokico calipers, each using two pads. To reduce gyroscopic mass and unsprung weight, 310mm floating rotors are used. The brake's performance was both positive and controllable with excellent power. AMP offered two decent braking areas as well as several areas for trail braking entering corners. The combination of reduced rotor diameters and linear braking feel helped when entering corners and in changing of direction.

Steering geometry has changed with the addition of 5mm in trail. This increase has the CBR totaling 102mm and has a desired effect and around the racetrack, the bike was always stable. Add to this another Honda innovation, an electronically controlled hydraulic steering damper mounted atop the upper triple clamp. This unit was developed with Kayaba and automatically adjusts according to vehicle speed and acceleration rates, each determined by the ECU and speedometer. Honda engineers explained that this system, at least in part, is designed for safety, helping riders avoid unexpected front end reactions while at speed. Its influence and change are obvious when riding, both from light to heavy damping.

Honda continues to work closely with Bridgestone and they were present to observe the performance of the OE fit BT 014 radials, and later try their latest race DOT BT 002 Battlax rubber. The day started out in the mid fifties so caution during the first session was in order. After a few sighting and get acquainted laps, it was time to go. The OE radials worked well with both grip and steering, but as expected, showed wear and were ready to be replaced at the conclusion of the fourth session. We opted to change only the rear for the next time out. Following lunch the sticky tires were mounted, the change requiring suspension adjustment from the settings used with the OE BT14's. Honda based their settings from previous tests. The replacement rear was considerably taller, a change that helped the CBR turn even quicker and increase front weight. Due to the cool conditions, Bridgestone opted for the softest of the three compounds they had available and as expected, the increased grip levels accounted for a 5 second drop per lap.

The new CBR 1000RR is here. Undoubtedly it will make its mark both on the track and street. It rips, is a pleasure to ride and feels smaller and more compact than any stock full-liter machine this tester has ridden to date. Honda did their homework this time around.

There remains much in the way of technical details with the CBR I have not mentioned.

Again, a detailed report will follow ...
the big kx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2006   #2
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

That report says absolutely nothing about how the bike felt to ride...
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Old 02-06-2006   #3
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

Originally posted by gummo
Add to this another Honda innovation, an electronically controlled hydraulic steering damper mounted atop the upper triple clamp. This unit was developed with Kayaba and automatically adjusts according to vehicle speed and acceleration rates, each determined by the ECU and speedometer. Honda engineers explained that this system, at least in part, is designed for safety, helping riders avoid unexpected front end reactions while at speed. Its influence and change are obvious when riding, both from light to heavy damping.



am I the on;y one that thinks tha re-gearing and PC'ing is gonna be more of a pain due to thing :confused
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Old 02-06-2006   #4
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

they sent the honda tech guys out from school (MMI) yesterday to watch. guess it was pretty cool. i wasnt there since im in k-tech. :nanana
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Old 02-07-2006   #5
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

ziadel said:
am I the on;y one that thinks tha re-gearing and PC'ing is gonna be more of a pain due to thing :confused

Yes.
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Old 02-08-2006   #6
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

Originally posted by ziadel
am I the on;y one that thinks tha re-gearing and PC'ing is gonna be more of a pain due to thing :confused Huh?

Sounds good. I was pretty sure Honda wasn't going to "lay an egg" (as one person here put it). Let's see what it does against the 10R and R1.Originally posted by geremy
That report says absolutely nothing about how the bike felt to ride... I don't agree with that. It talked about the user-friendly traction, the braking performance, the riding position, the engine music, the stability, the effect of the tire change, etc.
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Old 02-08-2006   #7
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

Originally posted by Nepenthe
Huh?



the steerin damnper action varies on speed, it gets that from the speedo, if you gear down and it thinks your going 80 when your really doing 60, I dunno, just seems like it might get weird...


not sure how a Power Commander would play into it but my gut tells me it will, from what I can imagine, I doubt the manufactrureres are very keen on people throwing those on their bikes....
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Old 02-08-2006   #8
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

Ah, now I get it, your first post was a little "iffy." :cool

I see what you mean about regearing.

As far as changing the fuel injection, yah, I don't think they necessarily want us doing that. But a solution in the aftermarket will be found, I'm sure.

On another note, A year or two ago there was talk that the EPA (and EU?) was going to make all exhaust systems and carbs/fuel injection computers tamper-proof.
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Old 02-09-2006   #9
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

ziadel said:
the steerin damnper action varies on speed, it gets that from the speedo, if you gear down and it thinks your going 80 when your really doing 60, I dunno, just seems like it might get weird...

Now I see. Yeah, that would be weird...
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Old 02-09-2006   #10
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Default First ride on the CBR 1000

If you regear your only off 10 to 15% (unless you go up like 12 in the rear) and it probably won't matter that much.

Also, with a recalibrator, the speedo is corrected so it's likely the ECU input in corrected as well.

As for FI, I think as bikes migrate to semi-closed loop systems (as cars are now), fueling will be a bit more problematic. Solutions will of course be found but they will probably be a bit more expensive.
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