Honda RC143: history, specs, pictures

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1961 Honda RC143
1961 Honda RC143
1960 Honda RC143

Participating in the 1960 race season, the Honda RC143 is a completely new bike from the RC142, the most conspicuous change being the switch from leading link front suspension to telescopic front forks, and although the frame type is still the spine type, practically everything else of the cycle parts is new.

The brakes are changed from single sided two-leading shoes to double sided single leading shoe.

The drive to the camshafts is still with bevel shaft and gears, but the cylinders are now inclined under 35 degrees. The position of the magneto is changed from the inlet camshaft to a place behind the cylinders. Bore and stroke are still 44 x 41 mm, and the power output is now 23 bhp at 14,000 rpm. The carburetors still have remote float bowls. The dry weight is 93 kg.

1960 Honda RC143 left side


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Honda RC143
Manufacturer Honda
Also called RC 143
Production 1962
Class Sport Bike
Engine Four-stroke twin
Bore / Stroke 43.2mm x 43.2mm
Horse Power 23.07 HP (17.2 KW) @ 14000RPM
Fuel system Carburetor
Transmission Gear box: 6 Speed
Weight  (dry), 98.0 kg (wet)
Manuals Service Manual
Tech Specs · Brochures · Reviews · Ads · Videos

The Honda RC 143 was a Four-stroke twin Sport Bike motorcycle produced by Honda in 1962. Claimed horsepower was 23.07 HP (17.2 KW) @ 14000 RPM.

Engine[edit]

A 43.2mm bore x 43.2mm stroke result in a displacement of just 125.0 cubic centimeters.

Drive[edit]

The bike has a 6 Speed transmission.

1962 Honda RC 143[edit]

Developing 23 horsepower at 14000 rpm, the Honda RC 143 sport motorcycle helped Tom Phillis achieve the first World Championship victory in 1961.


In Media[edit]