Vespa PX200E: history, specs, pictures

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Vespa-px200e-1982-1999-1.jpg
Vespa PX200E
Manufacturer
Production 1982
Class Scooter
Engine
Two stroke, single cylinder, air-cooled
Bore / Stroke 66.0mm x 66.0mm
Compression ratio 9.8:1
Horsepower 11.94 HP (8.9 KW) @ 5700RPM
Fuel System Carburetor
Transmission Gear box: 4-Speed, grip-shift, constant mesh

Final Drive: Direct drive

Clutch: Wet Multi-plate
Suspension Front: Coil spring with hydraulic shock absorber, double effect
Rear: Coil spring with hydraulic shock absorber, double effect
Brakes Front: 125 mm drum, expanding type
Rear: 127 mm drum, expanding type
Front Tire 3.5 x 10
Rear Tire 3.5 x 10
Wheelbase 48.58 inches (1234 mm)
Length 69.29 inches (1760 mm)
Width 27.4 inches (696 mm)
Weight 114.0 kg (wet)
Manuals Service Manual


The Vespa PX200E was a Two stroke, single cylinder, air-cooled scooter produced by Vespa in 1982. Claimed horsepower was 11.94 HP (8.9 KW) @ 5700 RPM.

Engine[edit]

A 66.0mm bore x 66.0mm stroke result in a displacement of just 198.0 cubic centimeters.

Drive[edit]

The bike has a 4-Speed, grip-shift, constant mesh transmission. Power was moderated via the Wet Multi-plate.

Chassis[edit]

It came with a 3.5 x 10 front tire and a 3.5 x 10 rear tire. Stopping was achieved via 125 mm drum, expanding type in the front and a 127 mm drum, expanding type in the rear. The front suspension was a Coil spring with hydraulic shock absorber, double effect while the rear was equipped with a Coil spring with hydraulic shock absorber, double effect. The wheelbase was 48.58 inches (1234 mm) long.

1982 - 1999 Vespa PX200E[edit]

1982 - 1999 Vespa PX200E 1982 - 1999 Vespa PX200E

In the mid-70s the basic Vespa design had been refined almost as far as it was able to go. However, changing consumer tastes, and new technologies, coupled with tightened regulations meant that Piaggio realised that it was time to totally re-design the Vespa chassis. The result was the P-series. It was such a large break from the previous style and design philosophy that many hard-core scooterists did not consider the P-series to be true Vespas, even well into the 90's. It is a debate that still continues, though the influx of new automatic scooters has tempered it and helped propel the P-series into the ranks of the classics.

Videos[edit]