Yamaha XV250 Virago 250 / V Star 250: review, history, specs

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Yamaha XV250 Virago
2007 Yamaha XV250 Virago
Manufacturer Yamaha
Also called Virago 250, V Star 250
Production 1988 - 1990, 1997 - 2012
Class Cruiser
Engine 249cc V-Twin, four-stroke
Bore / Stroke 49.0mm x 66.0mm
Compression ratio 10.0:1
Top speed 81 mph (130 km/h)
Horse Power 21.05 HP (15.7 KW) @ 8000RPM
Torque 44.26 ft/lbs (60.0 Nm) @ 6000RPM
Ignition type digital tci
Battery 10.0:1
Transmission Gear box: 5-speed

Final Drive: chain

Clutch: Wet multi-disc, manual
Suspension Front: 33mm telescopic fork 5.5 in travel
Rear: twin shocks, adjustable spring preload, 3.9 in travel
Brakes Front: single disc 282mm
Rear: expanding brake (drum brake) 130mm
Front Tire 3.00-18
Rear Tire 130/90-15
Wheelbase 58.66 inches (1490 mm)
Dimensions L 86.22 inches (2190 mm)
W 27.95 inches (710 mm)
H 41.73 inches (1060 mm)
Seat height 26.97 inches (685 mm)
Weight 306.44 pounds (139.0 Kg) (dry), 147.0 kg (wet)
Fuel capacity 2.51 Gallon (9.50 Liters)
Related Yamaha XV250
Yamaha XV535
Yamaha XV700
Yamaha XV750
Yamaha XV920
Yamaha XV1000
Yamaha XV1100
Competition Honda CMX250C
Suzuki GZ250
Kawasaki BN125
Manuals Service Manual
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The Yamaha XV250 Virago was a small displacement V-Twin, four-stroke cruiser motorcycle produced by Yamaha between 1989 and 2018. It could reach a top speed of 81 mph (130 km/h). Max torque was 44.26 ft/lbs (60.0 Nm) @ 6000 RPM. Claimed horsepower was 21.05 HP (15.7 KW) @ 8000 RPM.

Engine[edit]

The engine was a air cooled v2, four-stroke. A 49.0mm bore x 66.0mm stroke result in a displacement of just 249.0 cubic centimeters. Fuel was supplied via a single overhead cams (sohc).

Drive[edit]

The bike has a 5-speed transmission. Power was moderated via the Wet multi-disc, manual.

Chassis[edit]

It came with a 3.00-18 front tire and a 130/90-15 rear tire. Stopping was achieved via single disc in the front and a expanding brake (drum brake) in the rear. The front suspension was a 33mm telescopic fork while the rear was equipped with a twin shocks, adjustable spring preload. The XV250 was fitted with a 2.51 Gallon (9.50 Liters) fuel tank. The bike weighed just 306.44 pounds (139.0 Kg). The wheelbase was 58.66 inches (1490 mm) long.

1989 - 2005 Yamaha XV 250 S Virago[edit]

The XV250 Virago is a great beginners' bike, especially for those to whom cruisers appeal the most. Providing enough punch to be fun and thrilling, this bike is the perfect platform to help new riders learn more about riding, being non-intimidating while at the same time fast enough for highway use.

The bike can effortlessly carry two small saddlebags and adding a small windscreen and thus turn into a decent machine for weekend outings, picnics and even overnight trips.

2000 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]

2000 Yamaha XV250 Virago

The smallest of the Yamaha cruisers, the XV250 Virago is the perfect bike for a new rider who wants to get a taste of what the two-wheeled world is about. For both boys and girls, the 1999 iteration of this mini-cruiser is most likely going to become a best friend: its low seat provides excellent ground contact at low speed or when stopped, while the bike ergonomics are comfortable and reassuring while riding.

Light and nimble, the 1999 Virago 250 is great for commuting and small rides around the town, and can easily carry saddlebags, too.

2002[edit]

2003 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]

The 2002 Yamaha Virago 250 is a great choice for a first bike, but it can also become the commuter of choice for people with a budget-oriented mind who still want to share the joy of riding a small chopper. Low and reassuring for skinnier or shorter riders, the 2002 Virago 250 packs plenty of punch for two-up rides and you shouldn't be afraid taking it for a couple of hundred miles trip.

Affordable, cheap to run and maintain and most of all, fun to ride, the 2002 Virago 250 can also be customized with various add-ons to match the existing chrome accents.

2004 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]

2004 Yamaha XV250 Virago

Perfect as an entry-point cruiser for new riders and equally suitable as an economical urban commuter for those who are not too fond of scooters, the 2003 Virago 250 brings out the best of both worlds. The bike offers excellent comfort for a machine of its size, with a lightweight build and low, reassuring seat, while the 249cc air-cooled v-twin provides a great punch which makes two-up riding a breeze.

Add in saddlebags and a windscreen and you're also good to ride that extra mile on overnight trips and highway hauls. City errands, small shopping lists and the like included.

2005 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]


Great as an economical commuter and even greater as a first bike for a new rider, thew 2004 Virago 250 is all Yamaha cruiser technology in a smaller package. Packing plenty of punch for two-up rides in the city and even for longer hauls, the air-cooled v-twin engine is light and requires minimal maintenance. The dual stacked exhausts provide a throaty sound which resembles that of bigger bikes, while the cruiser attire makes a bold statement, too.

Excellent for shorter riders, the 2004 Virago 250 comes with a low seat which provides great ground contact when stopped, boosting confidence and being a very good learning platform.

2006 Yamaha XV 250 S Virago[edit]

The classic air-cooled Twin delivery provides just what the cruiser-oriented newbie is looking for, albeit in a smaller package. The diminutive size of the Yamaha cruiser is both its strength and weakness as a machine, with the Virago boasting an inviting 27-inch seat height to encourage smaller-statured men or women who would be ill-matched to ridiculous size of some of the larger cruisers available.

2006 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]

One of the finest entry-point bikes around, the Virago 250 is a great way for a new rider to get used to what motorcycles are really about, Small, light and low, this bike will make even shorter riders feel reassured and hop aboard it in full confidence.

The bike packs 249ccs of air-cooled v-twin grunt, with plenty of nerve for two-up riding and this expands the versatility and useability of the bike. Whether you're a new rider taking the first steps in the motorcycle world, or you're looking for a more economical commuter with authentic cruiser looks, the 2005 Virago 250 is there for you.

2007 Yamaha XV250 Virago[edit]

Small, terribly easy to ride, economical and above all - looking just like any of its bigger siblings, the 2006 Yamaha XV250 Virago is the perfect beginner bike for riders who want to check out what cruiser/chopper riding is all about. Lightweight and with decent room for two-up riding, the Virago 250 is also affordable and comes with minimal maintenance costs.

Accessories can turn this quarter-liter bike into a nifty cruiser for moderate distances. Adding a windscreen and saddlebags also increase comfort and convenience, making it a great replacement for car commuting and even for a little shopping...


2008 Yamaha V-Star 250[edit]

For 2008 the XV250 was re-branded as a V-Star instead of a Virago. Small, light, but nimble and packing more punch than meets the eye, the 2008 MY V-Star 250 is a great entry-point cruiser for both first-time riders or for people in search of an economical commuter with uncompromised cruiser styling. Taking off where the smallest Virago left off, the V-Star 250 proudly displays an air-cooled v-twin engine, with chain final driver and a 5-speed transmission.

American style shorty mufflers add to both aesthetics and the acoustic character, while the removable passenger seat allows riders to transform the bike into a nifty solo machine. Add in plenty of chromed details and optional luggage accessories and you can also take the 2008 MY V-Star 250 for a longer ride.


2009 Yamaha V-Star 250[edit]

The 2009 MY V-Star 250 is the perfect proof that big bike styling and small-bike convenience can be efficiently packed together into a machine that serves as both an economical ride and a great entry point for new riders. It's no use riding in fear, on a bike you know you can't control, and Yamaha knows this. So the V-Star 250 quarter liter was designed with useability and convenience in mid: it can carry two persons, and will gladly accept saddlebags and a windshield in case you plan longer rides.

Plus, it is affordable and easy to maintain and will not burden your budget too much, while adding new enjoyment to your everyday life.


2010 Yamaha V-Star 250[edit]

Light weight and a seat just 27 inches from the pavement make the V Star 250 a great trainer as well as a great choice for riders who appreciate the fun that comes in small packages. Dual exhausts, plenty of quality chrome and typical Star attention to detail; this is one sharp little cruiser. Front disc brake provides highly controllable stopping power. The V Star 250 achieves fuel economy up to an estimated 78 mpg with a fuel tank that holds 2.5 gallons of gas.


2011 Yamaha V-Star 250[edit]

The 2011 MY V-Star 250 is a great proof that even the smallest cruisers can look amazing. The V-Star 250 is the nephew of the old quarter-liter Virago, and takes things further into the realm of glorious entry-point cruisers, The bike retains the small-displacement air-cooled engine, the 5-speed transmission and and skinnier front wheel, while boasting on the chrome details and premium paint, fuel economy and overall affordability.

A great economical commuter the 2011 MY V-Star 250 is a neat educational machine for new riders, and can replace your big-bore cruiser when navigating through the urban jungle.


2012 Yamaha V-Star 250[edit]

Small doesn't necessarily have to be a synonym for lousy, and the 2012 MY V-Star 250 is the perfect proof for this. This quarter-liter cruiser is a great entry-point machine for the new riders and for those who want a small, economic, very nimble city cruiser to replace their 1,8-liter beast for daily errands or commuting.

The V-Star 250 looks great, just like any other Star, with impeccable paint and liberal use of chrome in all the right parts. This machine can ride two-up quite well, and adding saddlebags and a windscreen makes it ready for longer trips, too.

In Media[edit]