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Cycle Chaos > Cyclechaos Forums > Parts > Exhaust > is open exhaust or no muffler bad for carburated-motorcycle?

is open exhaust or no muffler bad for carburated-motorcycle?

This is a discussion on is open exhaust or no muffler bad for carburated-motorcycle? within the Exhaust forums, part of the Parts category; i'm thinking of changing or taking out the exhaust/muffler on my 2005 kawasaki eliminator 125. is this a bad idea ...


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Old 12-06-2008   #1
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Default is open exhaust or no muffler bad for carburated-motorcycle?

i'm thinking of changing or taking out the exhaust/muffler on my 2005 kawasaki eliminator 125. is this a bad idea for its engine, performance, etc? will something go wrong with the carburator ? i heard of"rejet"of carbs if exhaust is opened, is this necessary? will i foul-up the spark plug with an open-exhaust? i guess my bottom-line question is - is it really bad to have an open-exhaust for a motorcycle? (bad in terms of ruining the engine)
motor goozy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008   #2
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you need back pressure and it makes it harder opn gas. Depending what altitude you're at it may not run very good sice your jets are'nt letting enough air in for the amounts thats going out.
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Old 12-16-2008   #3
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You will need to use a bigger main jet as running without a muffler will allow the exhaust gasses to exit faster and have the engine run lean. The result could be a holed piston.Mufflers are used to cut down the noise. Even race bikes have some sort of noise reduction and are jetted to take that into account. Removing the noise reduction will increase performance but only if you re jet.Obviously the noise factor cannot be ignored in real life but for the sake of this question it has been disregarded.
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Old 12-20-2008   #4
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itwill perform worse with no exhaust cuz the motor needs back pressure- a performance exhaust will help but only if the carb is jetted to match. if its a 2 stroke, the exhaust is absolutely critical to its performance- the expansion chamber is what produces the power band
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Old 02-22-2009   #5
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your bike needs back pressure to run like it should, also if you are in a very cold area of thr country it is possible for cold air to get inside the cyl. when you shut the motor off,"when the piston is slowing down and comes to a stop if it reverses direction it can suck cold air into the cyl. and tha could crack your piston.... being hot and a rush of cold air hitting it. I would go with a tuned racing system if you are ollking for more power, and not just noise.. also some states require a spark arrester, i know all federal parks ans some stste parks require it ,...for it can be a fire hazzard.. happy motoring! ------
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