BMW R100GS Paris Dakar

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BMW R100GS Paris Dakar
Manufacturer
BMW
Production 1988 - 1996
Class Enduro
Engine
Four stroke, two cylinder horizontally opposed Boxer, 2 valves per cylinder
Compression ratio 8.5:1
Top Speed 176 km/h / 109 mph
Horsepower 59.94 HP (44.7 KW) @ 6500RPM
Torque 56.06 ft/lbs (76.0 Nm) @ 6500RPM
Ignition Electronic ignition, Bosch
Transmission 5 Speed
Frame Double loop tubular frame with bolt on rear section
Suspension Front: Telescopic fork with hydraulic shock absorber.
Rear: Paralever adjustable preload, rebound damping compression
Brakes Front: Single ∅285mm disc, 2 piston caliper
Rear: ∅200 Drum
Front Tire 90/90-21
Rear Tire 130/80-17
Wheelbase 1514 mm / 59.6 in
Seat Height 850 mm / 33.5 in
Weight 236 kg / 519 lbs (wet)
Fuel Capacity 35 L / 8.1 US gal
Manuals Service Manual

The BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar was a air-cooled, four-stroke, boxer twin cylinder, 2 valves per cylinder Road motorcycle produced by BMW between 1988 and 1996. Max torque was 56.06 ft/lbs (76.0 Nm) @ 6500 RPM. Claimed horsepower was 59.94 HP (44.7 KW) @ 6500 RPM. It could reach a top speed of 176 km/h / 109 mph.

Engine[edit]

The engine was an Air cooled cooled Four stroke, two cylinder horizontally opposed Boxer, 2 valves per cylinder. The engine featured a 8.5:1 compression ratio.

Drive[edit]

Power was moderated via the Dry single plate, with diaphragm spring.

Chassis[edit]

It came with a 90/90-21 front tire and a 130/80-17 rear tire. Stopping was achieved via Single ∅285mm disc, 2 piston caliper in the front and a ∅200 Drum in the rear. The front suspension was a Telescopic fork with hydraulic shock absorber. while the rear was equipped with a Paralever adjustable preload, rebound damping compression. The R100GS Paris Dakar was fitted with a 35 L / 8.1 US gal fuel tank. The wheelbase was 1514 mm / 59.6 in long.


1988 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1988 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar has been specially equipped for endurance enduro racing, and comes with features such as a single seat, side panniers, a large luggage rack, wide handlebars, a small windscreen, a front mud-guard, laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them and a large-capacity, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.

In all other departments it has the same features as the base R 100 GS. Power-wise, it can reach a maximum power output of 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.


1989 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1989 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar sports an air-cooled, four-stroke, 980cc, boxer two cylinder powerhouse mated to a five-speed manual transmission that can produce a claimed 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.

It also comes with standard features such as laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, a small windscreen, a single seat, a large luggage rack, a spacious, 35-liter (8.1-gallon fuel tank), an analogue instrument panel, and an under-seat exhaust system.


1990 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1990 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar is the most powerful and well-equipped machine in the House of Munich line-up, when it comes to off-road riding. It comes with laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.

In the engine department, it sports a four-stroke, air-cooled, 980cc, boxer twin cylinder powerplant paired to a five-speed manual transmission and can reach a maximum power output of 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.


1991 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1991 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar is a liter-class enduro machine that also boasts an extended range, as well as standard fittings such as laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.

At its heart lies an air-cooled, four-stroke, 980cc, boxer two cylinder powerplant mated to a five-speed manual transmission that can produce a claimed 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.


1992 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1992 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar sports a four-stroke, air-cooled, 980cc, twin cylinder boxer powerhouse paired to a five-speed manual transmission that can reach a maximum power output of 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.

Standard fittings for this machine include laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.


1993 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The House of Munich has launched a liter-class enduro for the more adventurous among Beemer fans, that also boasts a range of almost 300 miles. It comes with laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.

Also, a maximum power output of 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque is achieved by its four-stroke, air-cooled, 980cc, boxer two cylinder powerplant paired to a five-speed manual transmission with a shaft final drive.


1994 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1994 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar has, at its heart, an air-cooled, four-stroke, 980cc, boxer twin cylinder powerhouse paired to a five-speed manual transmission that can produce a claimed 60 horsepower and 76 Nm of torque.

It also comes with features such as laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.


1995 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The 1995 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar is addressed to those riders who want to get as dirty as possible when going for a stroll, whether it's somewhere close to home, or 200 miles away. It sports a four-stroke, air-cooled, 980cc, boxer twin cylinder powerhouse mated to a five-speed manual transmission that can produce a claimed 76 Nm of torque and 60 horsepower.

Standard fittings include laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.


1996 BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar[edit]

The Hosue of Munich has launched the 1996 MY BMW R 100 GS Paris Dakar for riders who want to spend more time behind the bars, as well as explore as much of this world as possible, and that are not afraid to get a little dirt on their boots. It boasts a maximum power output of 76 Nm of torque and 60 horsepower from its air-cooled, four-stroke, 980cc, boxer twin powerhouse paired to a five-speed manual transmission with a shaft drive.

In addition, it boasts the very best features from the German engineers, such as laced wheels with off-road tires mounted on them, an adjustable windshield, engine guards, side-panniers, a dual seat, pillion grab rails, a rear luggage rack, a front mudguard, an analogue instrument cluster and an extra-large, 35-liter (8.1-gallon) fuel tank.


Photos[edit]

Overview[edit]

In the 1980, BMW began an unlikely assosiation with the Paris Dakar Rally. At that time, the then 2 year old rally had been dominated by some rather uncommon machines: hand prepared BMW Airhead boxers. The demands of the Sahara were too great for the average dirt bike of the time. What was needed to win was a stone reliable machine with great range. To answer that question, teams prepared motorcycles that were largely stock, right down to their factory Bing or Dellorto carburetors. Yes, they ran more efficient air cleaners and open exhausts but power does not win Dakar, reliability and consistent performance does. The frames were reinforced, swingarms were lengthened and long travel shocks installed. The best forks and brakes of the day were pulled from KTM motocross bikes and installed on the BMW desert sleds. To finish the machine off, huge fuel tanks were fitted. Some of these hand hammered aluminum tanks held more than 11 gallons (US) of fuel. Of course the well known BMW shaft drive was largely impervious to the 5000+ miles of sand each machine would face. Yes, it was heavy but it was stone reliable and easy to maintain and that's what it took to win Dakar. Gaston Rahier and others rode these beasts to win after win. Yes, other bikes were faster or lighter but in the end, the reliability and the comfortable pace maintained by the BMW's eventually dominated.

BMW Accidentally Creates a New Genre of Motorcycling

To celebrate this achievement, BMW built Paris Dakar commemoritave bikes beginning in 1981. Labled the BMW R80GS, the bike featured white paint and a color scheme strangely reminescent of the rally bikes. It was basically a doctored R80 with longer travel suspension and high fenders. It also featured an uncommon feature for the day: a single sided swingarm. Labled the "MonoLever" it housed the ring & pinion in the right side of the swingarm. On the opposite side of the wheel, three lug bolts secured the wheel to the ring gear. The GS didn't really offer more fuel capacity or serious off-road capability but just as the 1975 GL1000 Gold Wing accidentally became the touring standard, the little GS invented a new segment of the market previously ignored: Adventure Touring. Imagine touring for days on paved roads, only to see a gravel road meanering off into the mountains--a gravel road you don't dare take your plastic wrapped touring barge onto. That's the market the R80GS was destined to dominate.



The BMW R80 GS enjoyed a small but rabidly enthusiastic and growing market. It continued largely unaltered from 1981 through 1987. In 1988, the machine recieved its first major revamp becoming the R100GS. We have a "Bumblebeemer" example of the 1988 model year here. The 1988 upgrade included a displacement bump from 800 to a full 1000cc's. The 800cc displacement was still available outside the United States albeit, with the newer chassis and styling. The new bike featured longer travel, stiffer front forks and another upgrade to the rear suspension, becoming the Paralever. This new system floated the ring & pinion housing with a torque arm, virtually eliminating the characteristic shaft drive pogo-effect while transitioning the throttle. This bike inched closer still to the BMW rally bikes that had also enjoyed continued success over in Africa.

1990 was to see the introduction of an official "Paris Dakar" conversion kit. This kit included a 9.0 gallon nylon fuel tank, a steel 'roo-bar' around a new fixed headlight assembly and instrument cluster with tachometer. Underneath, larger, vented skid plates attached to both the engine and the centerstand. A plastic fender extension--looking every bit like a childs sand shovel--added length to the front fender. Later in 1990, BMW began offering the 'kit' on factory motorcycles and labled it the R100GS/Paris Dakar. The factory bikes also included the factory BMW hard bags as standard equpment, as well as heated grips.

I vividly remember reading Bill Stermer's article in 1990 reviewing the new machine, as well as Clement Salvadori's awesome trip through Engineer Pass in Colorado. You didn't have to be a fan of the Paris Dakar Rally to see why this bike was so alluring. With its plush, long travel suspension, honest 300 mile range (before you start LOOKING for gas) and factory hard luggage, the big boxer quickly became a favorite among street-going BMW fanatics. Never mind taking it off road, this was a GREAT road bike. It quickly became one of BMW's best selling models and to this day, it is often argued to be the very best all-around Airhead BMW ever made. In later years, the Paris Dakar name had to be dropped due to licensing issues with the rally organizers so it was simply shortened to PD.

Source


Specifications[edit]

Make Model BMW R 100GS Paris Dakar
Year 1988 -89
Engine Type Four stroke, two cylinder horizontally opposed Boxer, 2 valves per cylinder
Displacement 980 cc / 59.8 cu in.
Bore X Stroke 94 x 70.6 mm
Cooling System Air cooled
Compression 8.5:1
Induction 2 x Bing carburetors
Ignition Electronic ignition, Bosch
Alternator Bosch 12V/280 W
Starting Electric
Max Power 44 kW / 60 hp @ 6500 rpm
Max Power Rear Tire 41.7 kW / 56 hp @ 6500 rpm
Max Torque 76 Nm / 7.75 kgf-m / 56 ft-lb @ 3750 rpm
Clutch Dry single plate, with diaphragm spring
Transmission 5 Speed
Gear Ratio 1st 4.40 / 2nd 2.86 / 3rd 2.07 / 4th 1.67 / 5th 1.50:1
Rear Wheel Ratio 1:3.09
Bevel / Crown Wheel 11/34 teeth
Final Drive Shaft
Frame Double loop tubular frame with bolt on rear section
Front Suspension Telescopic fork with hydraulic shock absorber.
Front Wheel Travel 225 mm / 8.8 in
Rear Suspension Paralever adjustable preload, rebound damping compression
Rear Wheel Travel 180 mm / 7.0 in
Front Brakes Single ∅285mm disc, 2 piston caliper
Rear Brakes ∅200 Drum
Front Wheel 1.85 - 21 MTH 2
Rear Wheel 2.50 - 17 MTH 2
Front Tire 90/90-21
Rear Tire 130/80-17
Dimensions Length 2290 mm / 90.1 in Width 1000 mm / 39.3 in Height 1165 mm / 45.8 in
Wheelbase 1514 mm / 59.6 in
Seat Height 850 mm / 33.5 in
Ground Clearance 200 mm / 7.9 in
Wet Weight 236 kg / 519 lbs
Fuel Capacity 35 L / 8.1 US gal
Average Consumption 7.1 L/100 km / 14 km/l / 33 US mpg
Braking 60 Km/h - 0 15.3 m / 50.2 ft
Braking 100 Km/h - 0 44.8 m / 147 ft
Standing ¼ Mile 13.1 sec / 158 km/h / 98 mph
Top Speed 176 km/h / 109 mph
Road Test Adventure Group Test Motosprint 1989 Adventure Group test Motosprint 1990

External Links[edit]