Yamaha FZR1000: history, specs, pictures

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Yamaha-fzr-1000-exup-2-1989-1995-0.jpg
Yamaha FZR1000
Manufacturer
Also called Genesis, FZR1000R
Production 1987 - 1995
Class Racing
Engine
in-line four, four-stroke
Bore / Stroke 75.5mm x 56.0mm
Top Speed 145 mph (234 km/h)
Horsepower 141.88 HP (105.8 KW) @ 10000RPM
Torque 78.85 ft/lbs (106.9 Nm) @ 8500RPM
Spark Plug NGK DP8EA-9 '87-95
Battery YUASA YB14L-A2 '87-95
Transmission Gear box: 5-speed
Final Drive: chain
Final Drive Chain: 532X110
Front Sprocket 17T
Rear Sprocket 47T
Brakes Front: dual disc
Rear: single disc
Front Tire 120/70-17 '87-88
130/60-17 '89-95
Rear Tire 160/60-18 '87-88
170/60-17 '89-95
Seat Height 30.51 inches (775 mm)
Weight 471.79 pounds (214.0 Kg) (dry), 236.0 kg (wet)
Oil Filter K&N KN-401
Fuel Capacity 5.02 Gallon (19.00 Liters)
Related Bimota YB6, Bimota YB8
Competition Honda CBR1000F, Kawasaki ZX1000A, Suzuki GSX-R1100
Manuals Service Manual


The Yamaha FZR1000 was a in-line four, four-stroke Racing motorcycle produced by Yamaha between 1987 and 1995. The 1987 version of the Yamaha FZR1000 had a top speed of over 155 mph. The 1989 version, crowned the "Bike of the Decade" by Cycle World, had 0-60 acceleration of 3.9 seconds, and a top speed of over 167 mph.

The unique feature which gave the 1989 onward models their 'EXUP' name was a servo motor driven exhaust valve. This allowed large bore exhaust header pipes (for excellent gas flow at high engine speeds) coupled with the valve restricting flow at lower revs, to speed the gas through. It gave pulling power from low revs, seamlessly, up to the red line at 11,500RPM. Yamaha used this valve system on the YZF models which followed (Thunderace) and the R1 models from 1998. It could reach a top speed of 145 mph (234 km/h). Max torque was 78.85 ft/lbs (106.9 Nm) @ 8500 RPM. Claimed horsepower was 141.88 HP (105.8 KW) @ 10000 RPM.


Engine[edit]

The engine was a liquid cooled in-line four, four-stroke. A 75.5mm bore x 56.0mm stroke result in a displacement of just 1003.0 cubic centimeters. Fuel was supplied via a double overhead cams/twin cam (dohc).

Drive[edit]

The bike has a 5-speed transmission.

Chassis[edit]

It came with a 130/60-17 front tire and a 170/60-17 rear tire. Stopping was achieved via dual disc in the front and a single disc in the rear. The FZR1000 was fitted with a 5.02 Gallon (19.00 Liters) fuel tank. The bike weighed just 471.79 pounds (214.0 Kg).



History[edit]

  • 1987-1988: FZR 1000 "Genesis"
  • 1989-1990: FZR 1000 "Exup", major motor and chassis redesign, two round headlights
  • 1991-1993: FZR 1000 "Exup", USD forks fitted, one rectangular headlight
  • 1994-1995: FZR 1000 "Exup", Revised USD forks, uprated brakes, two "fox-eye" shaped headlights.

In some countries old stock was carried on to sell in later years, notably 1996 models which are identical to 1995.

End of line[edit]

The FZR1000 quickly went out of production following the 1994 introduction and sales success of the Supersport series, lead by 1994's introduction of the Tadao Baba developed Honda Fireblade.[1] It was not until the 1998 development of the Yamaha YZF-R1 that Yamaha again caught up.

1987[edit]


1989[edit]

The EXUP it was a great bike. Wrenching open the throttle at 6000 rpm should have produced enough power to push the rear tire solidly into tarmac and known the front end skyward.

1990[edit]

1990 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black/Silver/Blue
1990 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black/Silver/Blue
1990 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black/Silver/Blue


1992[edit]

1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in White
1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in White
1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in White
1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in White
1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in White


1994[edit]

1994 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black
1994 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black
1994 Yamaha FZR1000 in Black


  • Revised USD forks, uprated brakes, two "fox-eye" shaped headlights.

1995[edit]

1995 Yamaha FZR1000 in White/Red/Blue
1995 Yamaha FZR1000 in White/Red/Blue
1995 Yamaha FZR1000 in White/Red/Blue
1995 Yamaha FZR1000 in White/Red/Blue
1995 Yamaha FZR1000 in White/Red/Blue


References[edit]


In Media[edit]